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Photographer Charles Dharapak: Thailand Railway Man

Thailand Railway AP Photos

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Categories: Railway construction, World War II, Rail transportation industry, Transportation and shipping, Industrial products and services, Industries, Business, Heavy construction industry, Construction and engineering, Transportation infrastructure, Events, Government and politics; People: Rod Beattie Location: Kanchanaburi, Thailand
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AP

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APTOPIX Thailand Railway Man
In this June 18, 2015, photo, a Thai Buddhist monk takes a souvenir picture while standing on the bridge on the River Kwai in Kanchanaburi, Thailand. As the 70th anniversary of World War II's end approaches and its veterans dwindle by the day, Australian Rod Beattie still slogs along the 415 kilometer (257 mile) length of Death Railway where more than 100,000 Allied prisoners and Asians were enslaved by Japan's Imperial Army to build the line along the Thailand-Myanmar border. With his own money, he maps its vanishing course, uncovers POW relics and with his vast database helps brings closure to relatives of those who perished and survivors who went to their graves never having shared their traumas. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

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AP

Kathleen Wilson

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Thailand Railway Man
In this Jan. 23, 2015, photo, Australian Kathleen Wilson, whose father worked the infamous Thailand Myanmar Death Railway, stands in the memorial cemetery in Kanchanaburi, Thailand. As the 70th anniversary of World War II's end approaches and its veterans dwindle by the day, Australian Rod Beattie still slogs along the 415 kilometer (257 mile) length of Death Railway where more than 100,000 Allied prisoners and Asians were enslaved by Japan's Imperial Army to build the line along the Thailand-Myanmar border. With his own money, he maps its vanishing course, uncovers POW relics and with his vast database helps brings closure to relatives of those who perished and survivors who went to their graves never having shared their traumas. (AP Photo/Denis Gray)

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AP

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Thailand Railway Man
In this June 18 2015, photo, a note of appreciation is left at a grave at the memorial cemetery for those who died building the Death Railway in Kanchanaburi, Thailand. As the 70th anniversary of World War II's end approaches and its veterans dwindle by the day, Australian Rod Beattie still slogs along the 415 kilometer (257 mile) length of Death Railway where more than 100,000 Allied prisoners and Asians were enslaved by Japan's Imperial Army to build the line along the Thailand-Myanmar border. With his own money, he maps its vanishing course, uncovers POW relics and with his vast database helps brings closure to relatives of those who perished and survivors who went to their graves never having shared their traumas. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

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AP

Rod Beattie

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Thailand Railway Man
In this June 18, 2015, photo, Rod Beattie uses a metal detector in a tapioca field as he looks for artifacts of the Death Railway, built during World War II, in Nam Tok, Kanchanaburi province, Thailand. As the 70th anniversary of the war's end approaches and its veterans dwindle by the day, Beattie, an Australian, still slogs along the 415 kilometer (257 mile) length of Death Railway where more than 100,000 Allied prisoners and Asians were enslaved by Japan's Imperial Army to build the line along the Thailand-Myanmar border. With his own money, he maps its vanishing course, uncovers POW relics and with his vast database helps brings closure to relatives of those who perished and survivors who went to their graves never having shared their traumas. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

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AP

Rod Beattie

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Thailand Railway Man
In this June 18, 2015, photo, Rod Beattie shows a rusted railroad bolt he just found, an artifact of the Death Railway built during World War II, in Nam Tok, Kanchanaburi province, Thailand. As the 70th anniversary of the war's end approaches and its veterans dwindle by the day, Beattie, an Australian, still slogs along the 415 kilometer (257 mile) length of Death Railway where more than 100,000 Allied prisoners and Asians were enslaved by Japan's Imperial Army to build the line along the Thailand-Myanmar border. With his own money, he maps its vanishing course, uncovers POW relics and with his vast database helps brings closure to relatives of those who perished and survivors who went to their graves never having shared their traumas. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

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AP

Rod Beattie

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Thailand Railway Man
In this June 18, 2015, photo, Rod Beattie shows a rusted railroad staple he just found, an artifact from the Death Railway built during World War II, in Nam Tok, Kanchanaburi province, Thailand. As the 70th anniversary of the war's end approaches and its veterans dwindle by the day, Beattie, an Australian, still slogs along the 415 kilometer (257 mile) length of Death Railway where more than 100,000 Allied prisoners and Asians were enslaved by Japan's Imperial Army to build the line along the Thailand-Myanmar border. With his own money, he maps its vanishing course, uncovers POW relics and with his vast database helps brings closure to relatives of those who perished and survivors who went to their graves never having shared their traumas. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

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AP

Rod Beattie

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Thailand Railway Man
In this June 18, 2015, photo, Rod Beattie navigates the path of the Death Railway, built during World War II, in Nam Tok, Kanchanaburi province, Thailand. As the 70th anniversary of the war's end approaches and its veterans dwindle by the day, Beattie, an Australian, still slogs along the 415 kilometer (257 mile) length of Death Railway where more than 100,000 Allied prisoners and Asians were enslaved by Japan's Imperial Army to build the line along the Thailand-Myanmar border. With his own money, he maps its vanishing course, uncovers POW relics and with his vast database helps brings closure to relatives of those who perished and survivors who went to their graves never having shared their traumas. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

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AP

Rod Beattie

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Thailand Railway Man
In this June 18, 2015, photo, Rod Beattie carries a metal detector, a machete, and GPS equipment as he looks for artifacts of the Death Railway, built during World War II in Nam Tok, Kanchanaburi province, Thailand. As the 70th anniversary of the war's end approaches and its veterans dwindle by the day, Beattie, an Australian, still slogs along the 415 kilometer (257 mile) length of Death Railway where more than 100,000 Allied prisoners and Asians were enslaved by Japan's Imperial Army to build the line along the Thailand-Myanmar border. With his own money, he maps its vanishing course, uncovers POW relics and with his vast database helps brings closure to relatives of those who perished and survivors who went to their graves never having shared their traumas. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

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AP

Rod Beattie

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Thailand Railway Man
In this June 18, 2015, photo, Rod Beattie points to the line mapping the the Death Railway, built during World War II, in Nam Tok, Kanchanaburi province, Thailand. As the 70th anniversary of the war's end approaches and its veterans dwindle by the day, Beattie, an Australian, still slogs along the 415 kilometer (257 mile) length of Death Railway where more than 100,000 Allied prisoners and Asians were enslaved by Japan's Imperial Army to build the line along the Thailand-Myanmar border. With his own money, he maps its vanishing course, uncovers POW relics and with his vast database helps brings closure to relatives of those who perished and survivors who went to their graves never having shared their traumas. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

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AP

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Thailand Railway Man
FILE - In this April 25, 2015, file photo, visitors make their way through Hellfire Pass following the ANZAC Day dawn service at the site of the infamous Death Railway, in Kanchanaburi, Thailand. Australian Rod Beattie, 67, arguably the world’s authority on the Death Railway, has busted myths that have accumulated around the railway. Among the inaccuracies Beattie has corrected is that no Australians were beaten to death at Hellfire Pass, contradicting folklore and a number of history books which flatly state that 68 were killed by Japanese guards. (AP Photo/Mark Baker, File)

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AP

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Thailand Railway Man
In this June 18, 2015, photo, the bridge on the River Kwai, immortalized in the 1957 Hollywood movie classic, is still in use in Kanchanaburi, Thailand, Thursday, June 18, 2015. As the 70th anniversary of World War II's end approaches and its veterans dwindle by the day, Australian Rod Beattie still slogs along the 415 kilometer (257 mile) length of Death Railway where more than 100,000 Allied prisoners and Asians were enslaved by Japan's Imperial Army to build the line along the Thailand-Myanmar border. With his own money, he maps its vanishing course, uncovers POW relics and with his vast database helps brings closure to relatives of those who perished and survivors who went to their graves never having shared their traumas. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

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AP

Alec Guinness

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Thailand Railway Man
FILE - In this 1957 file photo, actor Alec Guinness, right, stands in this scene from the film "The Bridge on the River Kwai" during its production in Sri Lanka. Australian Rod Beattie, 67, arguably the world’s authority on the Death Railway, has busted myths and inaccuracies that have accumulated around the railway. (AP Photo, File)

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AP

Rod Beattie

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Thailand Railway Man
In this June 18, 2015, photo, Rod Beattie shows how his machete has lost metal from years of using it to uncover the path of the Death Railway in Nam Tok, Kanchanaburi province, Thailand. As the 70th anniversary of World War II's end approaches and its veterans dwindle by the day, Beattie, an Australian, still slogs along the 415 kilometer (257 mile) length of Death Railway where more than 100,000 Allied prisoners and Asians were enslaved by Japan's Imperial Army to build the line along the Thailand-Myanmar border. With his own money, he maps its vanishing course, uncovers POW relics and with his vast database helps brings closure to relatives of those who perished and survivors who went to their graves never having shared their traumas. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

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AP

Rod Beattie

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Thailand Railway Man
In this June 18, 2015, photo, Rod Beattie uses a machete to clear a walking path along what was the Death Railway in Nam Tok, Kanchanaburi province, Thailand. As the 70th anniversary of World War II's end approaches and its veterans dwindle by the day, Beattie, an Australian, still slogs along the 415 kilometer (257 mile) length of Death Railway where more than 100,000 Allied prisoners and Asians were enslaved by Japan's Imperial Army to build the line. With his own money, he maps its vanishing course, uncovers POW relics and with his vast database helps brings closure to relatives of those who perished and survivors who went to their graves never having shared their traumas. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

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AP

Rod Beattie

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Thailand Railway Man
In this June 18, 2015, photo, Rod Beattie poses with a machete along the path of what was the Death Railway in Nam Tok, Kanchanaburi province, Thailand. As the 70th anniversary of World War II's end approaches and its veterans dwindle by the day, Beattie, an Australian, still slogs along the 415 kilometer (257 mile) length of Death Railway where more than 100,000 Allied prisoners and Asians were enslaved by Japan's Imperial Army to build the line along the Thailand-Myanmar border. With his own money, he maps its vanishing course, uncovers POW relics and with his vast database helps brings closure to relatives of those who perished and survivors who went to their graves never having shared their traumas. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

Usage Notes: This content is intended for editorial use only. For other uses, additional clearances may be required.

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