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AP

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Puerto Rico Hurricane Maria Roofless

In this June 13, 2018 photo, Rosa Rivera Martinez takes care of her bedridden husband Maximino Acosta Reyes, both living in a home with a damaged roof, in the Barriada Figueroa neighborhood, in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Many people lack insurance or other resources to rebuild on their own after Hurricane Maria. While the U.S. and Puerto Rican government have helped with grants and loans, they haven't been enough on an island where nearly half the people live in poverty. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Puerto Rico Hurricane Maria Roofless

In this June 13, 2018 photo, Carmen Lidia Torres Mercado reviews a document delivered by FEMA contractors after installing a roof awning on her residence located in the Barriada Figueroa neighborhood of San Juan, Puerto Rico. The 60-year-old retiree says she has no money to fix the roof on her own and doesn't have the documents proving home ownership she would need to qualify for assistance from FEMA. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Puerto Rico Hurricane Maria Roofless

In this June 13, 2018 photo, Gabriel Figueroa poses for a photo inside one of the rooms of the home he rents, that was damaged during the passage of Hurricane Maria, at the Barriada Figueroa neighborhood, in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Figueroa, a self-employed handyman said the owner of the rental moved to the U.S. and hasn't bothered to replace the roof panels that were blown away in the storm. He's saving up the $2,000 he needs to do it himself, but isn't there yet. "I don't want to wait much longer," he said. "I have kids and I have to protect them." (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Puerto Rico Hurricane Maria Roofless

In this June 13, 2018 photo, houses affected by Hurricane Maria, some of them with their missing roofs covered in sturdy blue tarp, stand in the middle of the El Gandul neighborhood, in San Juan, Puerto Rico. There are thousands of people in similar circumstances across Puerto Rico nearly nine months since the most devastating storm to strike the island in decades. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Puerto Rico Hurricane Maria Roofless

In this June 13, 2018 photo, 75-year-old retiree Angel Santos Rivera, who doesn't have social security income and survives mainly on food stamps, stands in his home as the hue of a blue tarp spills over his hurricane damaged home in Catano, Puerto Rico. Blue tarps or sturdier plastic sheets installed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are still widely visible around the island, though FEMA and local government agencies say they can't say for certain how many roofs still need to be replaced. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Puerto Rico Hurricane Maria Roofless

In this June 13, 2018 photo, a residence in the Figueroa neighborhood stands destroyed nine months after Hurricane Maria, in San Juan, Puerto Rico. While the Department of Housing channels millions in federal funds through the "Tu Hogar Renace" program to repair homes affected by the storm, there are still thousands of homes that are in need for repairs. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Puerto Rico Hurricane Deaths

Nerybelle Perez holds a picture of her father, World War II veteran Efrain Perez, who died inside an ambulance after being turned away from the largest public hospital when it had no electricity or water, days after Hurricane Maria passed, in Guaynabo, Puerto Rico, Thursday, June 7, 2018. Thousands of Puerto Ricans are hoping that the release of data related to all deaths reported after Hurricane Maria will lead to their loved ones being included in the toll of the storm, something they say will provide a sense of closure and show the American public the true cost of the hurricane. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Puerto Rico Hurricane Deaths

Nerybelle Perez holds a picture of her father, World War II veteran Efrain Perez, who died inside an ambulance after being turned away from the largest public hospital when it had no electricity or water, days after Hurricane Maria passed, Guaynabo, Puerto Rico, Thursday, June 7, 2018. Perez died as the ambulance drove him back to southwest Puerto Rico but he is not included in the island's official hurricane death toll of 64 people, a figure at the center of a growing legal and political fight over the official response to the Category 4 storm that hit Puerto Rico on Sept. 20, 2017. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Puerto Rico Hurricane Deaths

Nerybelle Perez goes through photographs of her father, World War II veteran Efrain Perez, who died inside an ambulance after being turned away from the largest public hospital when it had no electricity or water, days after Hurricane Maria passed, in Guaynabo, Puerto Rico, Thursday, June 7, 2018. Like Perez, thousands of sick Puerto Ricans were unable to receive medical care in the months after the storm caused the worst blackout in U.S. history, which continues to this day, with 6,983 home and businesses still without power Tuesday. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Puerto Rico Hurricane Deaths

Nerybelle Perez poses with a portrait of her father, World War II veteran Efrain Perez, who died inside an ambulance after being turned away from the largest public hospital when it had no electricity or water, days after Hurricane Maria passed, in Guaynabo, Puerto Rico, Thursday, June 7, 2018. Facing at least three lawsuits demanding more data on the death toll, Puerto Rico's government released new information on Tuesday that added detail to the growing consensus that hundreds or even thousands of people died as an indirect result of the storm. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Puerto Rico Hurricane Deaths

Nerybelle Perez holds several pictures of her father, World War II veteran Efrain Perez, who died inside an ambulance after being turned away from the largest public hospital when it had no electricity or water, days after Hurricane Maria passed, in Guaynabo, Puerto Rico, Thursday, June 7, 2018. The Puerto Rican government says it believes more than 64 died as a result of the storm but it will not raise its official toll until George Washington University completes a study of the same data being carried out on behalf of the U.S. territory. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Puerto Rico Hurricane Maria

In this May 16, 2018 photo, a worker with Cobra Energy Company, contracted by the Army Corps of Engineers, installs power lines in the Barrio Martorel area of Yabucoa, a town where many people are still without power in Puerto Rico. The Army Corps of Engineers is ending its work to rebuild Puerto Rico's electric grid, despite residents' fears that the island's government won't be able to restore power on its own to more than 16,000 people who remain blacked out eight months after Hurricane Maria. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Puerto Rico Hurricane Maria

In this May 15, 2018 photo, residents from Yabucoa, where many are still without power, protest outside the Electric Power Authority office, demanding the reestablishment of electricity eight months after Hurricane Maria, in San Juan, Puerto Rico. The sign reads in Spanish "Light now!" Many people on and off the island are dissatisfied by the decision to pull out the Army Corps of Engineers without the island's power fully restored. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Puerto Rico Hurricane Maria

In this May 16, 2018 photo, Alberto Rodriguez gives water to his wife Mirella Sepulveda who suffered a stroke in Yabucoa, a town where many continue without power in Puerto Rico. Rodriguez, a 65-year-old retiree, has solar panels and a diesel generator supplying power to the house where he takes care of his wife, who is confined to bed after suffering a stroke a month after the hurricane. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Puerto Rico Hurricane Maria

In this May 16, 2018 photo, a home in the Barrio Jacana Piedra Blanca still has a temporary canvas roof cover eight months after Hurricane Maria, in Yabucoa, a town where many residents continue without power in Puerto Rico. On Friday, May 18, the restoration of downed power lines will be handed back to the U.S. territory's bankrupt public utility, the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, or PREPA. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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18137857625479
Puerto Rico Hurricane Maria

In this May 16, 2018 photo, a worker from the Cobra Energy Company, contracted by the Army Corps of Engineers, installs power lines in the Barrio Martorel area of Yabucoa, a town where many residents continue without power in Puerto Rico. Trump administration officials say a big federal presence is no longer needed to hook up the relatively few remaining connections in the often-remote areas where people are still without power. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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APTOPIX Puerto Rico Hurricane Maria

In this May 16, 2018 photo, deteriorated U.S. and Puerto Rico flags fly on a roof eight months after the passing of Hurricane Maria in the Barrio Jacana Piedra Blanca area of Yabucoa, a town where many continue without power in Puerto Rico. Puerto Rican officials said 98.86 percent of PREPA's customers had electricity on May 17, but many remain without power as the longest blackout in U.S. history continues. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Puerto Rico Hurricane Maria

In this May 16, 2018 photo, tinsmith Otoniel Ramos Aponte poses for a portrait inside his mother's home, which lost its roof to Hurricane Maria but did not qualify for federal aid for repair in Yabucoa, a town where many continue without power in Puerto Rico. The Army Corps of Engineers is ending its work to rebuild Puerto Rico's electric grid despite fears the island's government won't be able to restore power on its own to more than 16,000 people who remain blacked out eight months after the storm. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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18137857608019
Puerto Rico Hurricane Maria

In this May 16, 2018 photo, an electric power pole leans over the road in the Piedra Blanca area of Yabucoa, Puerto Rico. Most of those still without power live in this town, which was the first place in Puerto Rico struck by Hurricane Maria on Sept. 20. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Puerto Rico Hurricane Maria

In this May 16, 2018 photo, Norma Medina, left, and a caregiver, move her elderly mother Tomasa Silva in Yabucoa, a town where many still live without power in Puerto Rico. Silva suffers Alzheimer's, diabetes and heart issues, requiring electricity to power her oxygen machine and IV, which they resolve with a generator. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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18137857575262
Puerto Rico Hurricane Maria

In this May 16, 2018 photo, a worker from the Cobra Energy Company, contracted by the Army Corps of Engineers, installs power lines in the Barrio Martorel area of Yabucoa, a town where many continue without power in Puerto Rico. A group of Corps officials plans to remain in Puerto Rico for several weeks to demobilize contractors and hand logistic operations back to FEMA and PREPA. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Puerto Rico May Day

A masked protester walked past burning debris set on fire by protesters after a May Day march turned violent, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Tuesday, May 1, 2018. The protest remained peaceful until hundreds of young protesters, many with their faces covered, threw rocks and other objects as they clashed with police who fired tear gas and rubber bullets to disperse the crowd. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Puerto Rico May Day

A woman asks for help after being hit by a stone during clashes between protesters and police after a May Day march turned violent, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Tuesday, May 1, 2018. The protest remained peaceful until hundreds of young protesters, many with their faces covered, threw rocks and other objects as they clashed with police who fired tear gas and rubber bullets to disperse the crowd. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Puerto Rico May Day

Police stand close by as protesters react to tear gas launched by police after a May Day march turned violent, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Tuesday, May 1, 2018. The protest remained peaceful until hundreds of young protesters, many with their faces covered, threw rocks and other objects as they clashed with police who fired tear gas and rubber bullets to disperse the crowd. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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