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AP

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Vatican Chile Sex Abuse

In this Feb. 11, 2018 photo, Juan Carlos Cruz, victim of Chilean pedophile priest Fernando Karadima, poses for a portrait in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Cruz will testify on Feb. 17, 2018 before the Vatican's onetime sex crimes investigator in a spinoff case that has raised questions about Pope Francis' already shaky track record on combatting sex abuse and cover-up. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Juan Carlo Cruz

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Vatican Chile Sex Abuse

In this Feb. 11, 2018 photo, Juan Carlos Cruz, victim of Chilean pedophile priest Fernando Karadima, poses for a portrait in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Cruz will testify on Feb. 17, 2018 before the Vatican's onetime sex crimes investigator in a spinoff case that has raised questions about Pope Francis' already shaky track record on combatting sex abuse and cover-up. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Week That Was From Latin America Photo Gallery

In this Jan. 31, 2018 photo, Public Works Sub-Director Ramon Mendez, wearing a hard hat at left, works with locals who are municipal workers, from right, Eliezer Nazario, Tomas Martinez and Angel Diaz as they install a new post to return electricity to Felipe Rodriguez's home, four months after Hurricane Maria hit the El Ortiz sector of Coamo, Puerto Rico. Coamo's city government relies on residents to tell it where damaged cables and posts are located, and uses hand-drawn maps to show homes that have power or need it, and the city updates the power company. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Puerto Rico DIY Power

In this Jan. 31, 2018 photo, Public Works Sub-Director Ramon Mendez, wearing a hard hat at left, works with locals who are municipal workers, from right, Eliezer Nazario, Tomas Martinez and Angel Diaz as they install a new post to return electricity to Felipe Rodriguez's home, four months after Hurricane Maria hit the El Ortiz sector of Coamo, Puerto Rico. Coamo's city government relies on residents to tell it where damaged cables and posts are located, and uses hand-drawn maps to show homes that have power or need it, and the city updates the power company. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Puerto Rico DIY Power

In this Jan. 31, 2018 photo, local residents who are municipal workers, from left, Angel Diaz, Edwin Pagan, Eliezer Nazario and Tomas Martinez pose for a group photo after installing a new post to restore power to the home of Felipe Rodriguez, four months after Hurricane Maria hit Coamo, Puerto Rico. More than 60 poles have been erected so far in Coamo by volunteers and municipal workers, but about 30 percent of people in the town still don't have power. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Puerto Rico DIY Power

In this Jan. 31, 2018 photo, Public Works Sub-Director Ramon Mendez, wearing hard hat, directs locals who are municipal workers, Eliezer Nazario, holding rope, Tomas Martinez, right, and Angel Diaz, left, as they install a power pole in an effort to return electricity to Felipe Rodriguez's home, four months after Hurricane Maria in Coamo, Puerto Rico. As the number of mayors complaining about the slow power restoration has grown, the territory's administration allowed municipalities to sign an agreement with the island's power company to take over power restoration efforts if interested and relieve the agency of any responsibility. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Puerto Rico DIY Power

In this Jan. 31, 2018 photo, municipal workers who are local residents install a new post as they work to restore power to Felipe Rodriguez's home, four months after Hurricane Maria hit the El Ortiz sector of Coamo, Puerto Rico. More than 400,000 power customers across Puerto Rico remain in the dark. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Puerto Rico DIY Power

In this Jan. 31, 2018 photo, El Progreso resident Felix Rodriguez Colon removes a broken road light as he helps municipal workers restore power lines, four months after Hurricane Maria hit the town of Coamo, Puerto Rico. Brigades of city volunteers helping to restore power include teachers, handymen, a postal worker and an accountant, backed by municipal workers with professional equipment, tools and experience in light electrical work. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Puerto Rico DIY Power

In this Jan. 31, 2018 photo, retired carpenter Felipe Rodriguez, far right, uses his pickup truck to help municipal workers, who are also locals, Eliezer Nazario, left, and Tomas Martinez move an electric post so they can install it near his home, four months after Hurricane Maria hit the El Ortiz sector of Coamo, Puerto Rico. Rodriguez also has no water and yet receives bills for services he's not getting. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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AP

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Puerto Rico DIY Power

In this Jan. 31, 2018 photo, Jose Luis Rodriguez smiles inside his living room after municipal workers restored power to his home, four months after Hurricane Maria hit Coamo, Puerto Rico. The people of this town have started restoring power on their own, pulling power lines from undergrowth and digging holes for wooden posts in a do-it-yourself effort to solve a small part of the United States' longest-running power outage. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Puerto Rico Foreclosures

This Friday, Jan. 19, 2018 photo, shows one of multiple properties located in the Esperanza sector that are currently for sale, in Vieques, Puerto Rico. Lenders are starting to demand payment from Puerto Ricans still struggling to make ends meet amid continuing power outages and a post-storm economic crisis. Even worse, many people stopped making mortgage payments after the hurricane because they thought the moratorium was automatic, when it was not. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Puerto Rico Foreclosures

his Friday, Jan. 19, 2018 photo, shows one of multiple properties located in the Esperanza sector that are currently for sale, in Vieques, Puerto Rico. Hundreds of thousands of Puerto Ricans face losing their homes upon the expiration of a three-month moratorium on mortgage payments that banks offered after Hurricane Maria devastated the island. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Puerto Rico Foreclosures

This Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2018 photo, shows one of multiple properties located in the Hato Rey sector that are currently for sale, in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Five months after the hurricane Maria hit the island, hundreds of thousands of Puerto Ricans face losing their homes as a moratorium on loan payments expires. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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AP

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Puerto Rico Foreclosures

In this Friday, Jan. 19, 2018 photo, shows one of multiple properties located in the Esperanza sector that are currently for sale, in Vieques, Puerto Rico. Hundreds of thousands of Puerto Ricans face losing their homes upon the expiration of a three-month moratorium on mortgage payments that banks offered after Hurricane Maria devastated the island (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Hector Pesquera + 2

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Puerto Rico Killings

Puerto Rico secretary of the Department of Public Security, Hector Pesquera, center, Puerto Rico Justice Secretary Wanda Vazquez, right, and U.S. Attorney Rosa Emilia Rodriguez, head to give a press conference in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Thursday, Jan. 16, 2018. Federal and local authorities in Puerto Rico say they will implement "broken windows" policing to fight a surge in killings this month across the U.S. territory. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Rosa Emilia Rodriguez + 1

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Puerto Rico Killings

U.S. Attorney Rosa Emilia Rodriguez, right, listens to Secretary of the Department of Public Security, Hector Pesquera, during a press conference in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Thursday, Jan. 16, 2018. Federal and local authorities in Puerto Rico say they will implement "broken windows" policing to fight a surge in killings this month across the U.S. territory. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Wanda Vazquez

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Puerto Rico Killings

Puerto Rico Justice Secretary Wanda Vazquez answers questions to reporters before giving a press conference, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Thursday, Jan. 16, 2018. Federal and local authorities in Puerto Rico say they will implement "broken windows" policing to fight a surge in killings this month across the U.S. territory. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Hector Pesquera

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Puerto Rico Killings

Hector Pesquera, secretary of the Puerto Rico Department of Public Security, answers questions to reporters in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Thursday, Jan. 16, 2018. Federal and local authorities in Puerto Rico say they will implement "broken windows" policing to fight a surge in killings this month across the U.S. territory. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Henry Escalera

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Puerto Rico Killings

Henry Escalera, interim commisioner of the Puerto Rico Police Bureau, gives a press conference in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Thursday, Jan. 16, 2018. Federal and local authorities in Puerto Rico say they will implement "broken windows" policing to fight a surge in killings this month across the U.S. territory. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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AP

Henry Escalera

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Puerto Rico Killings

Henry Escalera, interim commisioner of the Puerto Rico Police Bureau, leaves after giving a press conference in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Thursday, Jan. 16, 2018. Federal and local authorities in Puerto Rico say they will implement "broken windows" policing to fight a surge in killings this month across the U.S. territory. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Puerto Rico Crime Surge

FILE - In this Jan. 11, 2018 file photo, a forensic worker lifts a body at a crime scene in San Juan, Puerto Rico. The first month of 2018 was one of Puerto Rico's deadliest months in recent years as the U.S. territory struggles with a surge in violent crime and growing discontent among tens of thousands of police officers. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Puerto Rico Homicide Surge

In this Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018 photo, forensic workers remove the body of a man found fatally shot in San Juan, Puerto Rico. As the Island struggles to recover from Hurricane Maria, it is facing one of the biggest spikes in violent crime in nearly a decade amid a widespread power outage, severe unemployment and an increase in police absences. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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AP

18011545613746
Puerto Rico Homicide Surge

In this Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018 photo, forensic workers remove the body of a man found fatally shot in San Juan, Puerto Rico. As the Island struggles to recover from Hurricane Maria, it is facing one of the biggest spikes in violent crime in nearly a decade amid a widespread power outage, severe unemployment and an increase in police absences. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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AP

18011538286136
Puerto Rico Homicide Surge

This Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018 photo, shows a crime marker at the scene where a man was found fatally shot, in San Juan, Puerto Rico. As the Island struggles to recover from Hurricane Maria, it is facing one of the biggest spikes in violent crime in nearly a decade amid a widespread power outage, severe unemployment and an increase in police absences. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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