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AP

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Harvey Paving the Prairie

In this Thursday, Aug. 31, 2017 photo, Gordon Prendergast poses with the kayak he bought to see how his house in Houston's western neighborhoods fared after Harvey caused flooding in land that not long ago had been open prairie. Tens of thousands of homes were inundated when floodwater roared around the edge of Houston's Addicks Dam for the first time in its 70-year history. (AP Photo/Nomaan Merchant)

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AP

Floodwaters

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Harvey

A home is surrounded by floodwaters from Tropical Storm Harvey on Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017, in Houston. With its flood defenses strained, the crippled city of Houston anxiously watched dams and levees Tuesday to see if they would hold until the rain stops, and meteorologists offered the first reason for hope — a forecast with less than an inch of rain and even a chance for sunshine. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

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AP

Floodwaters

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Harvey

A boat navigates through floodwaters from Tropical Storm Harvey on Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017, in Houston. With its flood defenses strained, the crippled city of Houston anxiously watched dams and levees Tuesday to see if they would hold until the rain stops, and meteorologists offered the first reason for hope — a forecast with less than an inch of rain and even a chance for sunshine. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

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AP

Floodwaters

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Harvey

A home is surrounded by floodwaters from Tropical Storm Harvey on Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017, in Houston. With its flood defenses strained, the crippled city of Houston anxiously watched dams and levees Tuesday to see if they would hold until the rain stops, and meteorologists offered the first reason for hope - a forecast with less than an inch of rain and even a chance for sunshine. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

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Austin American-S ...

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Harvey Life And Death Of A Storm

FILE - Javier (no last name given) catches a carp in the middle of Brittmoore Park Drive in west Houston after the Addicks Reservoir overflowed due to days of heavy rain after Hurricane Harvey on Tuesday August 29, 2017. The push of subdivisions and freeways across what once was hundreds of square miles of flood-absorbing tallgrass prairies was part of the U.S.-leading population growth of Houston and surrounding Harris County. But the go-go-growth placed housing developments across the drainage basin of the two major reservoirs and dams safeguarding downtown Houston. (Jay Janner/Austin American-Statesman via AP)

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Houston Chronicle

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Harvey Life And Death Of A Storm

FILE - People wade through chest deep water down Pine Cliff Drive as Addicks Reservoir nears capacity due to near constant rain from Tropical Storm Harvey, Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017 in Houston. The push of subdivisions and freeways across what once was hundreds of square miles of flood-absorbing tallgrass prairies was part of the U.S.-leading population growth of Houston and surrounding Harris County. But the go-go-growth placed housing developments across the drainage basin of the two major reservoirs and dams safeguarding downtown Houston. (Michael Ciaglo/Houston Chronicle via AP)

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Austin American-S ...

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Harvey

Erik Peterson and his son, Carlos, 10, are rescued from their house to a dam on the Addicks Reservoir as waters rise from Tropical Storm Harvey in west Houston on Tuesday Aug. 29, 2017. More than 17,000 people are seeking refuge in Texas shelters, the American Red Cross said. With rescues continuing, that number seemed certain to grow. (Jay Janner/Austin American-Statesman via AP)

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AP

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Texas Daily Life

A great blue heron glides in for a landing on a flooded road near the Addicks Dam Thursday, May 5, 2016, in Houston. Parts of Eldridge Pkwy and Highway 6 west of downtown remain impassable more than two weeks after heavy rains caused massive flooding. (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan)

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AP

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Houston Politics of Flooding

A great blue heron glides in for a landing on a debris-strewn flooded road near the Addicks Dam, Thursday, May 5, 2016, in Houston. Parts of Eldridge Pkwy and Highway 6 west of downtown remain impassable more than two weeks after heavy rains caused massive flooding. The city is being overwhelmed with more frequent and more destructive floods. (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan)

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AP

16126644790484
Houston Politics of Flooding

Buzzards hang out on flooded North Eldridge Parkway near the Addicks Dam Thursday, May 5, 2016, in Houston. Parts of Eldridge Pkwy and Highway 6 west of downtown remained impassable more than two weeks after heavy rains caused massive flooding. The city is being overwhelmed with more frequent and more destructive floods. (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan)

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AP

16126644792744
Houston Politics of Flooding

A man works at Addicks Dam Thursday, May 5, 2016, in Houston. With clay soil and tabletop-flat terrain, Houston has endured flooding for generations. Its 1,700 miles of man-made channels struggle to dispatch storm runoff to the Gulf of Mexico. Now the nation’s fourth-largest city is being overwhelmed with more frequent and more destructive floods. (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan)

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Eureka Times Standard

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Dam Removal Deals

Four Yurok girls garbed in traditional tribal ceremonial clothing stand before the mouth of the Klamath River during the signing of the new Klamath Hydroelectric Settlement Agreement Wednesday, April 6, 2016, in Klamath, Calif. The agreement seeks to remove four hydroelectric dams from the 263-mile long river by 2020. (Will Houston/Eureka Times-Standard via AP)

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Eureka Times Standard

Jerry Brown + 1

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Dam Removal Deals

California Gov. Jerry Brown and Oregon Gov. Kate Brown share a conversation before the start of the Klamath Hydroelectric Settlement Agreement signing ceremony on Wednesday, April 6, 2016, in Klamath, Calif. The agreement seeks to remove four hydroelectric dams from the 263-mile long river by 2020. (Will Houston/Eureka Times-Standard via AP)

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Eureka Times Standard

Jerry Brown + 2

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Dam Removal Deals

California Gov. Jerry Brown sits and talks with his wife Anne Gust, center and U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell left, before the Klamath Hydroelectric Settlement Agreement ceremony Wednesday, April 6, 2016, in Klamath, Calif. The agreement seeks to remove four hydroelectric dams from the 263-mile long river by 2020. (Will Houston/Eureka Times-Standard via AP)

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The Times-Standard

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Dam Removal Deals

U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell speaks to a crowd of over 200 people at the mouth of the Klamath River before signing a new dam removal agreement Wednesday, April 6, 2016, in Klamath, Calif. Endangered salmon blocked for nearly a century from hundreds of miles of the river in Oregon and California are expected to return en masse under unusual new agreements to tear down four hydroelectric dams. (Will Houston/The Times-Standard via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

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