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Wallaces Daughter

FILE - In this June 11, 1963 file photo, Gov. George Wallace blocks the entrance to the University of Alabama as he turned back a federal officer attempting to enroll two black students at the university campus in Tuscaloosa, Ala. Wallace backed down when President John Kennedy federalized the Alabama National Guard and ordered troops to Tuscaloosa. Wallace's daughter, Peggy Wallace Kennedy, said her family has lived in the shadow of the schoolhouse door ever since. She said her father never told her why he did it and she never asked him before he died in 1998. Since then, she has been involved in civil rights events in Alabama. She wants to give hope to people by showing that families can change. (AP Photo/File)

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University of Alabama Race

In this June 11, 1963 photo, National Guard Brig. Gen. Henry Graham informs Gov. George Wallace, right, that the guard is under federal control as the two meet at the door of Foster Auditorium at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, Ala. Recent flaps over racially offensive language at the University of Alabama fit a pattern that's dogged the state's flagship school since it was integrated: Missteps along the path to greater diversity and inclusion often make more of an impression than positive strides do.(AP Photo)

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090902057943
Campus Elections Racial

In this Sept. 2, 2009 photo, University of Alabama senior Kendra Key poses for a photo against a background of former Student Government Association presidents on the campus of the University in Tuscaloosa, Ala. Key, a black candidate who narrowly lost the SGA presidency this year, 7,323 votes to 7,062, said a record 53 percent turnout in the spring election signals that the next wave of SGA officers may be more diverse. Other historically white Southern universities have had minority student presidents in the last decade, according to the American Student Government Association. At Alabama, however, where George Wallace made his "stand in the schoolhouse door" for racial segregation in 1963, no black has won the presidency since Cleophus Thomas Jr. in 1976. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)

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090902057935
Campus Elections Racial

In this Sept. 2, 2009 photo, University of Alabama senior Kendra Key is pictured on the campus of the university in Tuscaloosa, Ala. Key, a black candidate who narrowly lost the SGA presidency this year, 7,323 votes to 7,062, said a record 53 percent turnout in the spring election signals that the next wave of SGA officers may be more diverse. Other historically white Southern universities have had minority student presidents in the last decade, according to the American Student Government Association. At Alabama, however, where George Wallace made his "stand in the schoolhouse door" for racial segregation in 1963, no black has won the presidency since Cleophus Thomas Jr. in 1976. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)

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090902057927
Campus Elections Racial

In this Sept. 2, 2009 photo, University of Alabama senior Kendra Key poses for a photo against a background of former Student Government Association presidents on the campus of the University in Tuscaloosa, Ala. Key, a black candidate who narrowly lost the SGA presidency this year, 7,323 votes to 7,062, said a record 53 percent turnout in the spring election signals that the next wave of SGA officers may be more diverse. Other historically white Southern universities have had minority student presidents in the last decade, according to the American Student Government Association. At Alabama, however, where George Wallace made his "stand in the schoolhouse door" for racial segregation in 1963, no black has won the presidency since Cleophus Thomas Jr. in 1976. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)

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WALLACE SCHOOLHOUSE DOOR

FILE--Alabama Gov. George Wallace makes his stand against desegregation at the schoolhouse door of the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, Ala., in 1963. History will go full circle Thursday, Oct. 10, 1996, when Wallace helps honor a black woman for standing up to him 33 years ago. (AP Photo/Montgomery Advertiser, File)

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Civil Rights School Integration 1963

Troops from the federalized National Guard arrive on the campus of the University of Alabama, June 11, 1963 in Tuscaloosa. President Kennedy ordered the guard into service after Gov. George Wallace turned back two black students attempting to integrate the institution. (AP Photo)

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Civil Rights School Integration 1963

Two members of the Alabama National Guard paratroopers carry large watermelons just after being placed on stand by duty in connection with scheduled enrollment of two black students at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, June 9, 1963. The guardsmen said the melons were home-grown. Gov. George Wallace has called in about 500 National Guardsmen to handle any disorder that might arise when the students seek admittance to the white University. (AP Photo)

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Civil Rights School Integration 1963

Combat troops of the Alabama National Guard line up in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, June 9, 1963 just after alighting from trucks in background. They are part of 500 Guardsmen ordered here to quell a disorder that might arise when two black students are scheduled to enroll at the University of Alabama. (AP Photo)

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Civil Rights School Integration 1963

National Guardsmen loll around the campus near the dormitory of black student James Hood, on the campus of the University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa, June 14, 1963. In foreground a Confederate flag has been planted on a ?men working? sign. The Guardsmen are on duty against possible violence following integration of the university this week. (AP Photo)

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First African-American students at University of Alabama

The future student Vivian Malone, one of the first African-American students, enrolls at the University of Alabama for the summer semester on the 13th of June in 1963. Photo by: Schulmann-Sachs/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images

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First African-American students at University of Alabama

The future students Vivian Malone (l) and James Hood (r), the first African-American students, give an interview after having enrolled at the University of Alabama for the summer semester on the 13th of June in 1963. Photo by: Schulmann-Sachs/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images

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First African-American students at University of Alabama

Governor George Wallace (l) explains to representative minister of justice Nicholas Katzenbach (r) on the 13th of June in 1963, that he will not allow African-American students to enroll at the University of Alabama. Photo by: Schulmann-Sachs/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images

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First African-American students at University of Alabama

The future student Vivian Malone (M, back), one of the first African-American students, is accompanied by police men as she enters the University of Alabama on the 13th of June in 1963 to enroll for the summer semester. Photo by: Schulmann-Sachs/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images

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335208749642
First African-American students at University of Alabama

The future students Vivian Malone (l) and James Hood (r), the first African-American students, enroll at the University of Alabama for the summer semester on the 13th of June in 1963. Photo by: Schulmann-Sachs/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images

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265676048796
First African-American students at University of Alabama

The future students Vivian Malone (l) and James Hood (m), the first African-American students, enroll at the University of Alabama for the summer semester on the 13th of June in 1963. The person to the right is not identified. Photo by: Schulmann-Sachs/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images

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First African-American students at University of Alabama

Governor George Wallace (l) stands next to brigadier-general Henry Graham (r) on the 13th of June in 1963. Wallace explained that he will not allow African-American students to enroll at the University of Alabama, but had to give way at command of the repr Photo by: Schulmann-Sachs/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images

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First African-American students at University of Alabama

The future student James Hood (M, back), one of the first African-American students, is accompanied by police men as he enters the University of Alabama on the 13th of June in 1963 to enroll for the summer semester. Photo by: Schulmann-Sachs/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images

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