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Photographer Jacquelyn Martin

Jacquelyn Martin AP Photos

Jacquelyn Martin (b. 1979) carves out time from her work as a staff photojournalist with the Associated Press to work on personal projects. Race, identity, immigration and women’s issues are common themes in her work. Born in Syracuse, N ... Show More

Categories: Government and politics; Location: Washington, DIST. OF COLUMBIA, United States
Displaying 1 - 95  of  95 Results

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Tribe of Ghosts
Children play under mosquito netting inside a dormitory of the Kabanga Protectorate Center, housed in a walled compound for the Kabanga Primary School, in Kabanga, Tanzania on Monday, Aug. 27, 2012. The dorms are overcrowded as more people with albinism have been sent to live at the center by the government for their own safety. Having albinism, a genetic condition characterized by a lack of pigment in the body, can be a death sentence in Tanzania. Since 2006 more than 100 people with albinism have been physically attacked in the East African nation, 71 of whom died. Approximately 1 in every 1,400 people in Tanzania has albinism, compared to the world average of 1 in 20,000. Despite these high numbers misinformation about the condition abounds. Attacks by witch doctors, who use albino body parts in potions said to bring riches, have led the government to place children and adults with albinism into centers for their own safety. Although physically safe they are often stranded in the centers, many over-crowded boarding schools, with little long-term plan for their futures. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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Obama Business
A Secret Service Agent is seen through tinted and patterned glass as he stands in front of the door to a room where President Barack Obama was meeting with leading CEOs to discuss ways to promote the economy and create jobs during his last two years in office, Wednesday, Dec. 3, 2014, at the Business Roundtable Headquarters in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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APTOPIX GOP 2016 Santorum
Davonna Clyde, of Sarver, Pa., holds her daughter Lauren Clyde as they stand in a shaft of light while waiting for the arrival of former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, for his announcement that he is entering the Republican presidential race, Wednesday, May 27, 2015, in Cabot, Pa. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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Obama
President Barack Obama speaks about the economy and the middle class, Wednesday, March 18, 2015, at the City Club of Cleveland. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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APTOPIX Deep Freeze
Nick warms himself on a steam grate with three other homeless men by the Federal Trade Commission, just blocks from the Capitol, during frigid temperatures in Washington, Saturday, Jan. 4, 2014. A winter storm that swept across the Midwest this week blew through the Northeast on Friday, leaving bone-chilling cold in its wake. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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Tribe of Ghosts
Eumen Ezekiel, 13, hopes to become a member of Parliament to defend others living with albinism. He hasn't seen his mother in the four years he has lived at the Kabanga Protectorate Center, seen here in Kabanga, Tanzania on Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2012. "I wish to go home, even for one day," says Ezekiel, "one day would be enough for me." His mother protected him from attack by a group of men and lost the use of her arm from a machete injury she received in the attack. Having albinism, a genetic condition characterized by a lack of pigment in the body, can be a death sentence in Tanzania. Since 2006 more than 100 people with albinism have been physically attacked in the East African nation, 71 of whom died. Approximately 1 in every 1,400 people in Tanzania has albinism, compared to the world average of 1 in 20,000. Despite these high numbers misinformation about the condition abounds. Attacks by witch doctors, who use albino body parts in potions said to bring riches, have led the government to place children and adults with albinism into centers for their own safety. Although physically safe they are often stranded in the centers, many over-crowded boarding schools, with little long-term plan for their futures. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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APTOPIX Hot Weather
Lucas Olivo, 6, of Cheverly, Md., opens his mouth wide while running through a wall of water at Yards Park in Washington, on Thursday, June 21, 2012. Heat index values are expected to exceed 100 degrees across the northeast Thursday, according to the National Weather Service. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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APTOPIX Cherry Blossoms
With the Jefferson Memorial in the background, Steven Paska, 26, right, of Arlington, Va., kneels as he asks Jessica Deegan, 27, his girlfriend of two years, to marry him, near cherry blossom trees in peak bloom along the tidal basin in Washington, Thursday, April 10, 2014. Deegan said yes to the surprise proposal. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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APTOPIX Budget Deficit
Congressional Budget Office Director Douglas Elmendorf is reflected on a table as he speaks about the office's annual Budget and Economic Outlook during a news conference at the Ford House Office Building in Washington, Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2013. The federal budget deficit will drop below $1 trillion for the first time in President Barack Obama's tenure in office, a new report said Tuesday. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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Obama
A Secret Service agent watches as Marine One carries President Barack Obama from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Thursday, Oct. 30, 2014, to Andrews Air Force Base, Md. The president was en route to attend campaign and fundraising events in Maine and Rhode Island. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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APTOPIX Obama
Snow billows in the air as the Marine One helicopter, carrying President Barack Obama, lands on the South Lawn of the White House, on his return from Chicago, Thursday, Feb. 19, 2015, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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Capitol Hill Daily Life
A Capitol Hill staffer looks down at papers while on a cell phone while walking inside the Russell Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 30, 2015. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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Supreme Court Gay Marriage
Balloons that spelled out "HRC," Human Rights Campaign, and "love" float in the air as they are released outside of the Supreme Court in Washington, Friday June 26, 2015, after the court declared that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the US. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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Panda Pregnancy
Giant Panda Mei Xiang, mother of panda youngster Bao Bao who was born Aug. 23, 2013, sleeps in the indoor habitat at the Smithsonian's National Zoo in Washington, Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2015. The zoo says that the hormone levels of its adult female panda were rising, a sign that she might be pregnant. Mei Xiang, one of the two adult giant pandas which arrived here from China on Dec. 6, 2000, has started to show a secondary rise in her urinary progesterone levels since July 20 after she was artificially inseminated on April 26 and 27, the zoo said in a statement. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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Tribe of Ghosts
Daudi Danford, 33, left, and his wife Angelista Ngarama, 30, visit the grave of their two-year-old daughter Naimana, who has albinism and who they say was slaughtered by men under orders from a local witch doctor, in Kitahana Village, Tanzania, on Saturday, Sept. 8, 2012. A concrete slab has been poured over the grave to keep grave robbers from stealing her body parts. After the family was moved to the town center a man illegally started planting corn around the grave, thy recently discovered. Both parents must carry the albinism gene for it to be expressed in their children, and their youngest daughter lives at the Kabanga Protectorate Center. At two-years-old it is unknown if she will ever be safe enough to return home. Having albinism, a genetic condition characterized by a lack of pigment in the body, can be a death sentence in Tanzania. Since 2006 more than 100 people with albinism have been physically attacked in the East African nation, 71 of whom died. Approximately 1 in every 1,400 people in Tanzania has albinism, compared to the world average of 1 in 20,000. Despite these high numbers misinformation about the condition abounds. Attacks by witch doctors, who use albino body parts in potions said to bring riches, have led the government to place children and adults with albinism into centers for their own safety. Although physically safe they are often stranded in the centers, many over-crowded boarding schools, with little long-term plan for their futures. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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Tribe of Ghosts
Mwatatu Musa, 45, inside her one-room mud hut home near the border with Burundi in rural western Tanzania, on Friday, Sept. 7, 2012. As a young woman she was raped twice. She is ashamed and believes she was victimized because she has albinism. Having albinism, a genetic condition characterized by a lack of pigment in the body, can be a death sentence in Tanzania. Since 2006 more than 100 people with albinism have been physically attacked in the East African nation, 71 of whom died. Approximately 1 in every 1,400 people in Tanzania has albinism, compared to the world average of 1 in 20,000. Despite these high numbers misinformation about the condition abounds. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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Tribe of Ghosts
Wearing a ring that says love, "Doctor" Richard Nziguye, 75, holds tight to items used in his ceremonies to "quiet demons," in Kitahana Village, Tanzania, on Thursday, Sept. 6, 2012. Nziguye says he is quite famous. Although he calls himself a traditional healer, he says he can make magical potions that will bring the client riches. Potions to bring riches are a trademark of witch doctors in Tanzania, according to Under The Same Sun, an organization that works to improve conditions for people with albinism. Having albinism, a genetic condition characterized by a lack of pigment in the body, can be a death sentence in Tanzania. Since 2006 more than 100 people with albinism have been physically attacked in the East African nation, 71 of whom died. Approximately 1 in every 1,400 people in Tanzania has albinism, compared to the world average of 1 in 20,000. Despite these high numbers misinformation about the condition abounds. Attacks by witch doctors, who use albino body parts in potions said to bring riches, have led the government to place children and adults with albinism into centers for their own safety. Although physically safe they are often stranded in the centers, many over-crowded boarding schools, with little long-term plan for their futures. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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Tribe of Ghosts
Angel Salvatory, 17, who has skin cancer, buys cloth at the Kabanga Village market in Kabanga, Tanzania on Monday, Aug. 27, 2012. Having albinism, a genetic condition characterized by a lack of pigment in the body, can be a death sentence in Tanzania. Since 2006 more than 100 people with albinism have been physically attacked in the East African nation, 71 of whom died. Approximately 1 in every 1,400 people in Tanzania has albinism, compared to the world average of 1 in 20,000. Despite these high numbers misinformation about the condition abounds. Attacks by witch doctors, who use albino body parts in potions said to bring riches, have led the government to place children and adults with albinism into centers for their own safety. Although physically safe they are often stranded in the centers, many over-crowded boarding schools, with little long-term plan for their futures. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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Tribe of Ghosts
Janet Jotham braids the hair of her daughter Lucia Jotham, 8, during a visit to see her two children living at the Kabanga Protectorate Center in Kabanga, Tanzania on Monday, Aug. 27, 2012. If both parents are carriers of the albinism gene their children have a 25% chance of being albino. Having albinism, a genetic condition characterized by a lack of pigment in the body, can be a death sentence in Tanzania. Since 2006 more than 100 people with albinism have been physically attacked in the East African nation, 71 of whom died. Approximately 1 in every 1,400 people in Tanzania has albinism, compared to the world average of 1 in 20,000. Despite these high numbers misinformation about the condition abounds. Attacks by witch doctors, who use albino body parts in potions said to bring riches, have led the government to place children and adults with albinism into centers for their own safety. Although physically safe they are often stranded in the centers, many over-crowded boarding schools, with little long-term plan for their futures. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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Tribe of Ghosts
Children who have albinism use light from a flashlight to see as night falls at the Kabanga Protectorate Center, housed in a walled compound for the Kabanga Primary School, in Kabanga, Tanzania, Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2012. Having albinism, a genetic condition characterized by a lack of pigment in the body, can be a death sentence in Tanzania. Since 2006 more than 100 people with albinism have been physically attacked in the East African nation, 71 of whom died. Approximately 1 in every 1,400 people in Tanzania has albinism, compared to the world average of 1 in 20,000. Despite these high numbers misinformation about the condition abounds. Attacks by witch doctors, who use albino body parts in potions said to bring riches, have led the government to place children and adults with albinism into centers for their own safety. Although physically safe they are often stranded in the centers, many over-crowded boarding schools, with little long-term plan for their futures. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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Tribe of Ghosts
Maajabu Boaz, 20, holds the knives that he carries for safety outside his home in Nengo Village, Kibondo, Tanzania on Saturday, Sept. 8, 2012. He prefers to live in his village and refuses to be moved to a center, and his fierce reputation has kept him safe so far, despite children in the same village being attacked for having albinism. His name means wonder, or miracle, in Swahili. Having albinism, a genetic condition characterized by a lack of pigment in the body, can be a death sentence in Tanzania. Since 2006 more than 100 people with albinism have been physically attacked in the East African nation, 71 of whom died. Approximately 1 in every 1,400 people in Tanzania has albinism, compared to the world average of 1 in 20,000. Despite these high numbers misinformation about the condition abounds. Attacks by witch doctors, who use albino body parts in potions said to bring riches, have led the government to place children and adults with albinism into centers for their own safety. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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Tribe of Ghosts
Yonge, 4, was abandoned by her parents at the Kabanga Protectorate Center, seen here in Kabanga, Tanzania on Saturday, Sept. 1, 2012. A local Reverend is hoping to adopt her but has not been able to take her home due to red tape. Having albinism, a genetic condition characterized by a lack of pigment in the body, can be a death sentence in Tanzania. Since 2006 more than 100 people with albinism have been physically attacked in the East African nation, 71 of whom died. Approximately 1 in every 1,400 people in Tanzania has albinism, compared to the world average of 1 in 20,000. Despite these high numbers misinformation about the condition abounds. Attacks by witch doctors, who use albino body parts in potions said to bring riches, have led the government to place children and adults with albinism into centers for their own safety. Although physically safe they are often stranded in the centers, many over-crowded boarding schools, with little long-term plan for their futures. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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Tribe of Ghosts
Angel Salvatory, 17, has skin cancer and has been living in the Kabanga Protectorate Center for the last four years, seen in Kabanga, Tanzania on Thursday, Aug. 30, 2012. Her maternal grandparents were killed protecting her from an attack led by her own father. She is interested in becoming a journalist. Having albinism, a genetic condition characterized by a lack of pigment in the body, can be a death sentence in Tanzania. Since 2006 more than 100 people with albinism have been physically attacked in the East African nation, 71 of whom died. Approximately 1 in every 1,400 people in Tanzania has albinism, compared to the world average of 1 in 20,000. Despite these high numbers misinformation about the condition abounds. Attacks by witch doctors, who use albino body parts in potions said to bring riches, have led the government to place children and adults with albinism into centers for their own safety. Although physically safe they are often stranded in the centers, many over-crowded boarding schools, with little long-term plan for their futures. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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Tribe of Ghosts
Angel Salvatory, 17, who has skin cancer, with her half-brother Ezekiel, 1, and mother Bestida, who she had not seen in the four years she has lived away from home, after her own father led a group of men to attack her, seen at Kabanga Protectorate Center, in Kabanga, Tanzania on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2012. She is interested in becoming a journalist. Having albinism, a genetic condition characterized by a lack of pigment in the body, can be a death sentence in Tanzania. Since 2006 more than 100 people with albinism have been physically attacked in the East African nation, 71 of whom died. Approximately 1 in every 1,400 people in Tanzania has albinism, compared to the world average of 1 in 20,000. Despite these high numbers misinformation about the condition abounds. Attacks by witch doctors, who use albino body parts in potions said to bring riches, have led the government to place children and adults with albinism into centers for their own safety. Although physically safe they are often stranded in the centers, many over-crowded boarding schools, with little long-term plan for their futures. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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