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Pregnancy survey

Pregnancy survey. File photo dated 25/06/08 of a pregnant woman as women should stay healthy during pregnancy to keep children's lead levels low, new research suggests. Issue date: Friday September 6, 2013. The findings from the Children of the 90s study at the University of Bristol shows that mothers who drank alcohol and coffee, smoked and had a coal fire in their home during pregnancy were likely to have higher levels of lead in their blood than women who did not. Lead is a toxin that can cause high blood pressure in pregnancy, which in turn can predispose women to pre-eclampsia during pregnancy and heart disease later in life. It accumulates in the bones and can remain for up to 30 years, the researchers said. Exposure to high levels of lead while in the womb, when it is transferred from the mother, can affect the unborn baby's developing nervous system. It can also have a longer-term detrimental effect on the child's health, academic performance and behaviour. See PA story HEALTH Pregnancy. Photo credit should read: Katie Collins/PA Wire URN:17508469 (Press Association via AP Images)

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876446697363
September 06, 2013 04:00:00 AM
September 06, 2013 02:05:44 AM
Katie Collins
EMPPL PA Wire
Associated Press
17508469/pa-news-20130906-030324-health_p
UK OUT ; ARCHIVE OUT ; For use in North America only, AP Members and clients are not permitted to archive PA Photos images ;FILE PHOTOFILE PHOTO ;PA-URN:17508469
Women's health, Pregnancy and childbirth, Health, Sexual and reproductive health, Pregnancy and childbirth
health pregnancy
London, UK
NYWWP

This content is intended for editorial use only. For other uses, additional clearances may be required.

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